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    The 11th Weekly Power-User Challenge (October 20th, 2017): Flipping Mates - Robot Case Study

    Alin Vargatu

      Please watch this video, for a complete explanation of what is expected in this challenge: https://youtu.be/JZZ_Y_tryy8

       

       

      Hello SOLIDWORKS Power-Users and welcome to the 11th WPUC!

       

      Other than having fun solving riddles, the goal of this week's WPUC is the same as always: facilitate through brainstorming the finding of new techniques and methods, for the benefit of the SOLIDWORKS Community.

       

      Hopefully we will:

      1. Identify areas where SOLIDWORKS' functionality needs enhancements
      2. Design workarounds to overcome the current lack of functionality
      3. Submit new ERs or promote existing ERs that are relevant to this WPUC topic.

      This week I propose we focus on the flipping angle mate problem, and especially on workarounds to simulate the functionality of angle limit mates.

       

      As a case study please download the simplified assembly of a 3 axes articulated robot. If you have SOLIDWORKS 2015 or newer, you can download the assembly file, otherwise, please download the Parasolid file.

       

      The challenge is very simple and you can win up to 10,000 points

       

      1. For eternal glory and 5000 points, be the first to mate the base in such a way that it can rotate +/- 185 degrees. The mate has to be as stabile as possible during move/rotate, suppress/resolve operations, configuration changes and other manipulations. Upload the assembly file in this thread.

      2. If you are not first to provide a valid solution to point 1, hope is not lost. If your solution is valid and significantly different you will win 1,000 points. To clarify, I will use my discretion to award these 1,000 point prizes, using subjective criteria that are not worth discussing here.

       

      3. For eternal glory and 5000 points, be the first to fully mate the robot. To further simplify the mating scheme, please use the red faces as visual references for the rotational limits. It does not happen in real life, but in this case we will pretend that the red faces will touch at extreme positions. Upload the assembly file in this thread.

       

      Note: You do not need to use the red faces in mates.

      4. If you are not first to provide a valid solution to point 3, you can still win points. If your solution is valid and significantly different you will win 1,000 points. To clarify, I will use my discretion to award these 1,000 prizes, using subjective criteria that are not worth discussing here. You know me by now; I am easily seduced by elegant, sexy solution, which are also practical.

       

      Because the level of difficulty is lower in this challenge, I would ask the VAR and SOLIDWORKS employees to not submit solutions until Wednesday, the 18th of October at noon.

       

      We accept submissions until Friday, the 20th of October, at 5 pm, EDT.

      Good luck to all participants!

       

      Even if you do not want to submit your entries to this challenge, you are very welcome to contribute to the discussion. What can we do to reduce the flipping pain that so many SOLIDWORKS users experience today?

      Please be constructive and provide realistic and concrete arguments. No rants, please!

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