14 Replies Latest reply on Oct 6, 2017 8:56 AM by Wayne Schafer

    Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead

    Nolan L.

      I am looking for best practices and tips regarding welding structural members.

       

      1) What is the real difference between applying fillet beads vs weld beads?

      2) What are the pros/cons of each?

      3) How do I apply actual material properties to the weld bead or fillet? (Weld Bead Properties>Weld Material - then one can type anything in this box instead of selecting a material with properties associated)

      4) Is it best to apply welding in the part file of each piece or once several parts are in an assembly?

      5) How do I apply actual weld processes (Same as above question) (Weld Bead Properties>Weld Process)

      6) Should I even be spending time on welding in general if I do not need to stress test my product?

       

      General tips and best practices welcome!

       

      Nolan

        • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
          Glenn Schroeder

          All I can tell you is what I do here.  The only time I've ever actually modeled a weld was when a client asked me to because he wanted to know the length of weld required.  My normal practice is to just call out the welds in the Drawing. 

            • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
              Matt Peneguy

              I'm with Glenn on this one.  An alternative is to add the weld as an annotation in the part file/ assembly and pull it into the drawing as a model item...If you want.  That way the "Design Intent" follows the part from project to project.  It all depends on your particular workflow.

                • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                  Glenn Schroeder

                  Matt Peneguy wrote:

                   

                  I'm with Glenn on this one. An alternative is to add the weld as an annotation in the part file/ assembly and pull it into the drawing as a model item...If you want. That way the "Design Intent" follows the part from project to project. It all depends on your particular workflow.

                   

                  That's a good point.  Anything I work with that gets welded is project specific, but I'm sure there are other places where that isn't the case.

                    • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                      Nolan L.

                      I am new to SolidWorks and my company is as well so I don't really have a workflow.. trying to figure all of that out.

                      Glenn Schroeder you've helped me on a few of my pieces before - are there benefits to welding parts together after mating them? As far as I can tell for all visual purposes, mating items together fixes them into place and allows me to keep working thus no 'need' to weld.

                        • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                          Peter Kennedy

                          Not unless you want to visually show the weld or have the information automatically transfer to the drawing. Mating is what will actually define the location parts will be placed not welds.

                          • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                            Glenn Schroeder

                            Anything that gets welded together I typically create as a multi-body Part, using the Structural Member function (even plate; see Using Plate in Weldments) .  There are many advantages to this workflow, though not everyone agrees.  I'll be happy to elaborate, or answer any questions if you want to give it a try.

                              • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                Nolan L.

                                I read your 'Using Plate in Weldments' a while back actually, good stuff.

                                Multi-body parts is a new concept to me. I have seen this term referenced however I do not understand its concept.

                                I am unfortunately still at the stage in SolidWorks where I do not know where to stop building a part, and start an assembly.

                                How complex is one recommended to go with a single part before starting an assembly? I realize this may differ from industry to industry as well as individual preference but surely there are standards.

                                  • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                    Glenn Schroeder

                                    I doubt there is any standard that regulates when a multi-body Part should become an Assembly.  I believe it's a judgment call made when a Part becomes too complex.  Mine rarely have more than a handful of bodies.  I had one a while ago with well over 40, but I don't recommend that.

                                      • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                        Matt Peneguy

                                        Glenn,

                                        I created the below part as a multi-body part and it seems reasonably stable.  If I'd have made it as an assembly, it would have required quite a few mates... And for me mates always seem to give me problems.  Maybe I'll end up with a problem with this part, but it seems to work okay, now.  What are your thoughts?

                                          • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                            Glenn Schroeder

                                            Matt Peneguy wrote:

                                             

                                            Glenn,

                                            I created the below part as a multi-body part and it seems reasonably stable. If I'd have made it as an assembly, it would have required quite a few mates... And for me mates always seem to give me problems. Maybe I'll end up with a problem with this part, but it seems to work okay, now. What are your thoughts?

                                             

                                             

                                            If it's working well for you then I don't see any reason to change.

                            • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                              Peter Kennedy

                              Like Glenn Schroeder mention calling out the welding in the drawing is what I usually do.

                               

                              According to Solidworks help they say for performance issues avoid Fillet Beads and used Weld Beads: 2015 SOLIDWORKS Help - Weldments - Fillet Weld Beads

                              • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                Jim Steinmeyer

                                     Nolan, first off, you can never go wrong following Glenn's advice. On the other hand, I am one that has not ventured into the multi-body arena except to dip my toe barely into weldments. Almost everywhere I have been each part is it's own individual part and needs a separate number and drawing. Our parts can easily be found in a couple dozen assemblies. Multi body parts are not conducive to that workflow in my experience. I could be wrong, I have been doing individual parts for a long time and it is hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Really it depends more on how your company wants to use your output.

                                ***Note: this is not set in stone and is my opinion.

                                 

                                Now: a fillet weld is a weld bead, just a specific type. Over the years I have poked at using 3D welds in Pro-E, Inventor and SW and then I have run swiftly the other way. The packages are getting better but I still don't like them. They can be very time consuming to get the weld where you want it compared to placing a weld symbol on a drawing. If your welders can read a print with weld symbols you can share all of the information needed that way clearly. If they can't you can use caterpillars and notes on the drawings faster than trying to place welds. I have also found welds to cause display challenges so I stay away from them.

                                 

                                From another of your questions, a part is a single part, once it is welded it is considered an assembled item, at least with the MRP systems I have worked with so you would never have the weld information with the part. only in assemblies. Even a formed piece of sheetmetal that has the seams welded. Again that is just my experience and your company might do things different. We have always had 2 part numbers, one for the part and one for the welded item.

                                • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                  David Matula

                                  Weld beads...less they are a real customer requirement to see in the model just don't show them.  There are the weld gaps that we add so that the parts can be fit together.  Best weld practices is to create blocks for your weld details.  Then there is the (32 page) weld procedure that someone has to put together for the shop that will be doing the welding that really goes into details as to who can weld, what to weld with, ect so that the structural members become one fused part for you. 

                                  Welding can be done with so many different machines there is the mig, tig, stick, sub arc.  Each process has its own ups and downs and do we really care what they use as a designer/drafter....I could not even find the on button on half the machines nor even get close to operating one.  The main thing that I am looking for is that end product that will come out of the weld shop...when materials are important we change up the weld procedure in the notes, that was specifically made up for the type of parts that we are making.   That is when I depend on the engineers to decide on these things.

                                  • Re: Welding - Fillet bead vs Weld bead
                                    Wayne Schafer

                                    We use weld bead here a lot for quick estimates on total weld length.  We know are robots can weld so many inches per min and we use the total weld length to get a quick cost estimate.

                                     

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