15 Replies Latest reply on Oct 2, 2017 2:36 PM by Doug Seibel

    How often?

    Maha Nadarasa

      How often you have to change your Personal Computer?

       

      From google search it is advised once in a three years.

       

      Problem is if you put an expensive video card for SWX, once in a three years you have to remove it to put it in a new computer. Whether it will be compatible with new computer is questionable.     

        • Re: How often?
          Steve Calvert

          Our company has a lease that's 3 years.

           

          Steve C

          • Re: How often?
            Dan Pihlaja

            Yeah....most companies seem to (from my experience) wait until Solidworks is (almost) totally unusable before replacing the computer.  Generally there will be other failures before that though. 

            • Re: How often?
              Doug Seibel

              As a general rule, when you upgrade the computer, you upgrade the entire computer.  (Besides, removing a video card from one computer and putting it in another computer is NOT difficult or time-consuming.)

               

              Where I work, the CAD workstations are replaced about every 5-8 years.  I received my current computer in January 2012 and I am sure that it will be a few more years before I'm upgraded to a new one.

                • Re: How often?
                  Maha Nadarasa

                  What is meant by upgrading "entire" computer?

                    • Re: How often?
                      Doug Seibel

                      Entire:

                      Having no element or part left out.

                      Entire | Definition of Entire by Merriam-Webster

                       

                      The graphics card from the previous computer is generally not removed and used in the new computer.  The new computer is ordered with a new (better, faster, and usually less expensive) graphics card.  We do not go down to Best Buy when it is time to replace a computer.  We special-order them, custom built exactly how we need them  so we get the best possible performance.  The graphics card from the previous computer would be considered obsolete due to current graphics card being much faster and more powerful.  Computers are constantly getting better, faster, more powerful.  They are also constantly getting less expensive.  The reason for upgrading a computer is so you can have a faster computer and thus spend less time waiting on the computer and more time actually working.

                        • Re: How often?
                          Maha Nadarasa

                          From you view it is not prudent to put a expensive graph card for home computer because it may not be compatible with next generation of computer.

                            • Re: How often?
                              Doug Seibel

                              Maha Nadarasa,

                              Either what I say is getting mixed up in translation, or confused in interpretation.  So I will try to make my view very simple and clear.

                               

                              Every time you buy a new computer for running Solidworks on, you buy one with a new (expensive) graphics card.

                               

                              The reason this is my view is because in several years, when you are replacing your computer, the new expensive graphics cards will be much better than the old graphics card in your old computer.

                      • Re: How often?
                        Wojciech Paterski

                        funny you started this, as our IT guy just ordered 2 new machines so we have some back-ups when we get contractors or machine fails.

                        Obviously they will be better than mine and my colleague so we will be taking the new ones:)

                        both with p4000 cards and kaby lake 7700k cpus:)

                         

                        he did ask us if we think it would be better with p2000 or p4000 - but i'm not going to oppose to better gpu (at the moment i have k5200 anyways)

                        • Re: How often?
                          Alen Topic

                          Hey Maha,

                           

                          Our companies life cycle is every two years, but we always do post upgrading as per need basis.

                           

                          Alen

                          • Re: How often?
                            Richard Gergely

                            I had on pre xeon  E5 processors worked on complete new workstations every 3 years.

                             

                            But it has been pretty stagnant on big jumps in processor speed in recent years so this 3 year idea hasn't held true.

                             

                            My current workstation had the first gen E5-1620 processor and was bought when they first came out and bizarrely is the first workstation that was worth upgrading instead of buying a new rig. It's had more ram and 500gb SSD drive upgrade 2 years ago.

                             

                            I'm probably looking in 2018 at a new xeon w processor workstation and will be glad to be back on the 3 year cover next day on site service if nothing else. Though I always have a spare workstation around in case one goes pop and I need to get on with work.

                             

                            Quite incredible I think this workstation will be 6+ years old by then. In previous times a 6+ years workstation would have been incredibly slow compared with a new rig but on the contrary it's not bad by any stretch of the imagination.

                            • Re: How often?
                              Christian Chu

                              One thing to keep in mind is engineer time is much more expensive than computer - whenever, you think it slow you down then time to replace it. Most companies provide the fastest computers to engineer then switch these systems to technicians or manufacture floor after upgrading to new computers