3 Replies Latest reply on Jul 18, 2017 4:12 PM by Ryan Dark

    Conduction - outer surface temperature

    Mohamed Bkekria

      I have a rectangular shaped 120 x 120 mm object with a 8.8 mm thickness, i want to apply a temperature in the interieur surface ( blue one indicated in the image ) of that object equals to 120 degree celcuis, i want to know what would be the temperature at the outer surface of that object. if i simply do, then the temperature ll be all the same in all the object and the outer surface ll have a 120°c temperature also ( image 2 ), how can i solve my problem which consists of knowing the temperature at the external surface after applying temperature in the interior one.

       

       

      Results of only interieur temperature apply.pngObject shape and applying surfaces.png

        • Re: Conduction - outer surface temperature
          Ryan Dark

          Hi Mohamed,

          If you apply only the temperature definition you show in your images then the steady state solution would have that temperature applied to the entire model.  Do you have other boundaries applied?

           

          Generally speaking, temperature boundaries in thermal simulation are not true to any particular real life situation.  I have always used different boundaries in place of temperature boundaries wherever it is feasible to do so.  With that in mind, what is the real life scenario you are looking to simulate heat transfer for here?

            • Re: Conduction - outer surface temperature
              Mohamed Bkekria

              Yea, i want to know what would be the temperature at the surface of the model, i have like a fluid going inside that model, and its temperature is 120°c so i wanted to know what would be the temperature of the outer surface of the model instead of going through manual conductive calculations

                • Re: Conduction - outer surface temperature
                  Ryan Dark

                  If you have a fluid running on the inside then you need to start off by replacing your temperature definition with a convection definition setting the ambient fluid temperature to 120.

                   

                  Then, you need to determine what the ambient fluid temperature is on the outside of the model as well and likewise apply convection on the outer surface as well.  At that point you would see a temperature gradient (it will be small considering the wall thickness itself) across the thickness of the model.