3 Replies Latest reply on Jun 12, 2017 7:12 AM by Bernie Daraz

    Creating DXF and Revision Control

    Wayman John

      Good morning,

      We are trying to reduce the overhead of drawings by sending DXF or STP files to our suppliers, with reduced-standard/keypoint drawings.

      There are several ways to create a DXF to represent our part:

      1. Open the part, select the appropriate face, Right-Click, Export to DXF/DWG

      2. Open the part, File, Save As, DXF

      3. Open the drawing, File, Save As, DXF

       

      Each has its specific advantages and disadvantages.

      1 - No Scaling issues, but no automatic way to reference the Revision and Status of the part - need to type the revision into the filename.

      2 - No Scaling issues, but no automatic way to reference the Revision and Status of the part - need to type the revision into the filename.

      3 - Potential for Scaling issues, but the Revision and Status are shown in the drawing border.

       

      Which is the best way to handle the production of DXF files and the maintenance of the link between Revision and Status of drawing and DXF?

       

      Is Solidworks PDM Standard able to control DXF files? Assuming the next version does indeed automatically create PDF files, will it similarly cope with DXF or STP files?

       

      SW 2016, SP5

      Workgroup PDM

       

      Cheers,

       

       

      John

        • Re: Creating DXF and Revision Control
          Bernie Daraz

          There have been more than a few conversations on getting completely away from drawings. I would suggest that you still supply a controlling document (drawing) showing a the external dimensions and a few holes dimensioned as well. If there was to be a scaling issue the vendor still has to comply with the drawing. If you supply models or DXF files many here have suggested that you also state that models or DXF files are for reference only.

           

          The benefit is that drawing will have the properties you need going forward.

            • Re: Creating DXF and Revision Control
              Wayman John

              Thanks, Bernie,

              I agree, as I said in the OP, we send the DXF together with a reduced-standard/keypoint drawing. By this, I mean the drawing shows only those key points that are not clear from the DXF, such as tapped holes, weld information, surface finish, limits and fits, etc. plus some dimensions that establish the scaling.

              However, such is the ingenuity of engineers (such as myself) and suppliers, we have still had instances of the Revision of the DXF not matching the Revision of the keypoint drawing, which leads either to confusion or scrap.

              The question was aimed at trying to determine what methods others use to ensure these errors are kept to a minimum.

               

              Cheers,

               

               

              John

                • Re: Creating DXF and Revision Control
                  Bernie Daraz

                  John,

                   

                  Could the issue come from a revision issue such as using revisions in the file name? I had contracted at a firm earlier in my CAD career where they never used a revision level noted anywhere except internally (SW files) and in the documentation supporting a build. I am speaking of a chassis containing a PC board, some external jacks, a chassis with holes for those jacks. There may have been other features but describing them would not add anything here.

                   

                  At the retirement of that revision of the build they would have us (engineering) Pack&Go that release to a file. We could then use the existing files to build a new revision. Again a revision is never referred to in the file name. Only active releases are capable of being accessed from the prototype or WIP folders. Somewhere I have a macro that converts the current file to DXF (drawings), PDF and saves those to the Design Binder within the current SW document. (The files are also available individually and separately.) Using Pack&Go zips those file without additional actions. Of course it would be required to run the macro when finished editing any file so any available file is automatically the correct revision.

                   

                  This did increase the SW file size but for security and convenience it was great.