9 Replies Latest reply on Dec 18, 2008 11:21 PM by 1-1NHKU5

    Drawings of assemblies

      What's the best approach to generating drawings of assemblies? Say you have an assy of five parts. Do you generate a new drawing file for each part and one for the assy or can it all be done within a single file. Is there a way to start with the assy and then add sheets that would document the parts?

      I can't find part-level visibility when a drawing is linked to an assy rather than a part. In other words, once done documenting the assy, how do you add a sheet that refers to one of the parts within the assy?

      Thanks,

      -Martin
        • Drawings of assemblies
          John Lhuillier
          Add a drawing sheet to the drawing file that has your assembly views, then you can insert model views by choosing the parts when inserting drawing views.
          • Drawings of assemblies
            Thanks...figured it out.

            This could use some improvement...it's an assy...so you might just want to insert part views in a drawing.

            -Martin
              • Drawings of assemblies
                Alan Stoldt
                Martin,

                Perhaps I'm misunderstanding your problem here.

                If you want a drawing with an Assembly in it, and parts shown on the "Assembly" drawing as well, you can do so.

                If you need the parts in the same file and want them on a different tab (sorta like an Excel Spreadsheet), just click with the RMB (Right Mouse Button) on the tab and choose add sheet.

                When adding parts to drawings, there are many ways to do it. I normally jusy have the individual files open, then pull them off the pallet at the right hand side of the screen.

                Hope This Helps.
                  • Drawings of assemblies
                    Thanks, I poked around and figure it out. Even though we've been using SW for many years we've almost never generated drawings. The vendor we were working with could take our SW files and a design notes document and fabricate from there (mostly sheet metal). Now we are working with a couple of vendors that can't do that and drawings are necessary. So I am literally just cracking the drawings side of SW open for the first time in probably five years!

                    -Martin
                • Drawings of assemblies
                  David Edwards
                  SW works best if you have a drawing file for each component then an assembly drawing just for the assembly. That doesn't stop you from having them all in one drawing though. Each sheet's template file should update per the first item placed on that sheet.
                    • Drawings of assemblies
                      > SW works best if you have a drawing file for each component then an assembly drawing just for the assembly.

                      Can you explain why this might be the case. I just completed a drawing where the assembly and all the parts within it are in one drawing file (multiple sheets). You are saying that this is not good practice with SW?

                      Thanks,

                      -Martin
                    • Drawings of assemblies
                      Hi Martin,

                      What you've presented is a bigger question than it seems. What you are really asking is, 'What is the best way to structure company data?' If you are a very small shop with few parts, assemblies, and drawings, then you can handle your data in a 'freeform' way without much detriment. But if you get a little bigger, suddenly it becomes vital to the survival of the company that you have standard, structured ways of doing things, otherwise it becomes extremely difficult and time-consuming to find your data, duplication occurs, errors creep in, and you end up with chaos.

                      As an example, if one of our customers orders a replacement part, they will give our purchasing agent a part number. He will take that part number and look for it in our SW drawings directory and will find what he is looking for, a drawing of the part. This works because there is a drawing for every part and every drawing has its part number as its file name. If I put my component drawings within the assembly drawings, he wouldn't know where to look. Furthermore, I might recreate the drawing because I wouldn't have any way of knowing that it already existed within the assembly drawing. Also, I use my components in many different assemblies. Which one would be the right assembly to contain the component's detail drawing?
                        • Drawings of assemblies
                          Ray,

                          I can see what you describe. We've been very careful about managing data. It can be a daunting task when you consider the range of components that go into making a product today, from sheet metal to plastics and machines parts, from wiring harnesses to software and calibration jigs. Keeping it organized in a sensible fashion is, as you said, a much larger matter.

                          While I like the ability to include all parts of an assy within one drawing file I think we are going to move away from that and create one drawing per part as you suggest. There are lots of advantages to that approach. It is easier to database the resulting files. Also, we use the Google Desktop Search tool extensively and it can be amazingly useful if you take the time to name files and directories with future searching in mind.

                          -Martin
                        • Drawings of assemblies
                          Wayne Tiffany
                          The flip side of that is like us. We are a PROJECT based place vs. a PRODUCT based place. We duplicate part numbers all the time as they are different jobs. We generate a variety of drawings, some with the assy & the wlmt & the parts all on one sheet. Some are too big so another drawing is started. The main point is that most of our drawings will never be used again as that job won't happen just like that again. We can still order service parts from those drawings as the first place to look is the job number.

                          Then again, we do have some standard parts that are used all the time. These are more the "standard" method of one part per drawing, etc.

                          It just depends on the bigger picture.

                          WT