5 Replies Latest reply on Apr 28, 2017 7:26 AM by Peter Brinkhuis

    What network switch performance should I get

    Greg Raymond

      Hello,

       

      We are running SolidWorks on Virtual Machines here at the company. It is very slow and my guess is that the network switch is limiting the performance of SolidWorks. All of the files are local to the server and that's where our VM are at, so I feel like they should be running much faster. My question is what kind of speed and graphic cards are optimal for SolidWorks 2016? I am looking between 100 Mbps, 1 Gbps, and 10 Gbps network switch.

       

      Also what kind of graphical performance is optimal? There is currently 16 Gb of memory assigned to each of the VM that run solidworks.

        • Re: What network switch performance should I get
          Andy Sanders

          Do NOT get a 100 Mbps network switch.  That's an ancient technology now. 

          We had this battle about 6 years ago and we upgraded to 1 Gbps and it made a huge difference.

          All links in the chain need to be upgraded too, but most modern PC are gig.

          • Re: What network switch performance should I get
            Peter Brinkhuis

            I've had gigabit ethernet in my house for ten years, so I hope you'll get at least that. 10 Gbps won't do much probably, but it's great that you have CAT 6 already. Usually the connection between a remote pc and another pc is optimized for bandwidth. That's why things like thin clients and Teamviewer work well.

             

            Why the virtual machines though? That sound like you're begging for horrible performance. I hope the performance has improved over the years, but using anything other than a dedicated PC with Windows and a decent graphics card used to be a no-go.

             

            When I was researching my new laptop a few months ago it seemed like SolidWorks could work on a Macbook Pro, so I guess things have improved a bit.

             

            What are the specs of your server? A high frequency, few core CPU is a great idea, but that's usually opposite of what a server CPU is. With how many people are your working on te server?