3 Replies Latest reply on Apr 14, 2017 11:48 AM by Ryan Dark

    Thermal expansion resulting from power, which study?

    Noah Bettin

      I'm looking for simulation of thermal expansion and surface temperature of a steel die on one side as I'm applying wattage with heaters on the opposite side and capping temperature via thermocouple near the heaters. Static simulation outputs thermal expansion and temperature as results, but doesn't allow power as an input. Thermal simulation does allow power as an input but doesn't output thermal expansion as a result. How do I do this?

        • Re: Thermal expansion resulting from power, which study?
          Ryan Dark

          Hi Noah,

          For the situation you describe first run your thermal analysis in order to obtain the temperature gradients across your model.  Once that is complete create a static study in which you use the option for 'Thermal/Flow Effects' (found in the static study properties).  This will let you bring the temperature results from your thermal analysis across to the static study in order to solve for thermal expansion.

            • Re: Thermal expansion resulting from power, which study?
              Noah Bettin

              Purrrfect! That worked, thank you. Can you recommend any particular source of info/tutorials on the SW Sim workbenches and how they function?

                • Re: Thermal expansion resulting from power, which study?
                  Ryan Dark

                  There are, of course, the built in tutorials for Simulation just under 'Help', 'SOLIDWORKS Simulation', 'Tutorials'.  These are a pretty good variety of situations and study types

                   

                  I think some people overlook the Verification Problems (under 'Help', 'SOLIDWORKS Simulation', 'Validation', 'Verification Problems').  The verification problems are comparisons of the program against analytical solutions and can give some good insight into how loads/fixtures/connections really work as well as the math behind them.  Better understanding of how the program works leads to better assumptions in your own simulations and, ultimately, more reliable data.