6 Replies Latest reply on Apr 12, 2017 7:12 PM by Maha Nadarasa

    Sketch turned into Red colour

    Maha Nadarasa

      I placed points on the sketch to make holes (sketch 23). When I placed 5th point sketch turn into red color. What is the reason for that?

       

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        • Re: Sketch turned into Red colour
          Jim Steinmeyer

          For some reason you have either over defined the sketch or the last point is creating a conflict with the existing sketch constraints. I usually look at the red constraints and see which one I can delete without having the sketch move.

          • Re: Sketch turned into Red colour
            Matt Peneguy

            I don't presume to know what you are dealing with, but if those two outlines you are trying to get are in a sketch you may make use of "derived sketch". Then you won't have to worry about all those relations.  Just remember to lock down the derived sketch.  It has like 2 degrees of freedom when you create it.  It wants to move and rotate, and after a while of thinking, I realized that was on purpose,

            Select the plane where you want your new sketch and the underlying sketch, then go to Insert>Derived Sketch.

            Good luck.

              • Re: Sketch turned into Red colour
                Jim Steinmeyer

                I am still trying to get a hang of "Derived" anything. I go to insert a sketch or a tube profile from the design liabrary and it asks me if I want the part Derived. I don't know, just give me the part so i can use it!

                  • Re: Sketch turned into Red colour
                    Matt Peneguy

                    Yeah, I've seen that before... I have not played around with "Derived Parts".  So, I can't comment on how or why you'd use them.

                    I only know a little about derived sketches and they seem quite useful.  Where they really excel over convert entities or drawing over the top of existing geometry, is that if you delete something or change a circle to a square in the underlying sketch, it automagically gets updated in the derived sketch.  Try that with convert entities or if you draw over existing geometry.

                    And to elaborate on why it isn't fully defined when you create it, I think that was on purpose.  Say you want the derived sketch offset for some reason, it is possible because when you create the derived sketch, it can be linearly offset and rotated, until you lock it down with either two points, an angle and a point or something else.  Once again, you can't do that with convert entities or drawing over existing geometry.

                    I am sure there are downsides on using derived sketches.  I hope someone weighs in on those.