45 Replies Latest reply on Oct 31, 2016 10:29 AM by James Riddell

    Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?

    Eric Snyder

      Folks...

      I have been a Solidworks user since 2007. Over all those years we have had a crash history. Some years were worse than others and some saw significant improvements from the previous year release. We have multiple users running Solidworks using a Network License. All of our users are currently using "homebuilt machines". I started with a Dell desktop with a built in video card. As we grew we started building our own machines. Some of these machines have been built from plans that Charles Culp and Anna Wood have designed. My deepest thanks to both for their substantial contributions to this forum! More recently we have spec'ed our own builds. All machines were always verified against Solidworks recommendations. All machines are running approved video drivers.

       

      We also moved to a NAS for data storage and we all work from the NAS for our file storage. We rarely work local and save remote - we usually work and save remote. I do not believe that we have seen an uptick in crashes with the introduction of the NAS.

       

      In the past we have sometimes submitted crash reports. Most of the time we do not submit the reports as the problem is almost never repeatable.

       

      We have done support tickets in the past on some crashes when it became severe. I can remember once or twice when we tried a complete clean reinstall. We usually get suggestions from tech support that our assemblies are built wrong, a setting needs to be tweaked or some other idea. Every tech seems to have a different approach. Those kinds of suggestions have been helpful and appreciated never seem to resolve the issue.

       

      We currently are running in the neighborhood of 1 crash every two days to sometimes 5-6 crashes in a single day. This is per machine/seat.

       

      Over all the years there was one year that was markedly worse (Sorry, don't remember the year). Other than that it seems that no matter what we change, how many tech support cases we open or how many crash reports or Rx we submit they never seem to go away.

       

      My questions:

       

      1) What in your opinion is a reasonable number of crashes that one can expect using Solidworks?

      2) In your opinion - for those that have moved from network storage to PDM standard or Professional, has that improved your crashes?

      3) Have any of you had a similar story? If so, were you able to get the crashing resolved? If so, how?

       

       

      *Edit*

       

      You failed to mention what version (year) you're using and what modules you're using.

       

      Using 2016 SP4. We stay up to date except for a brief time in 2009 when the market was really crappy. I use Simulation and SW Professional. Other here just use plain ol Solidworks.

        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
          Anna Wood

          What are you doing with SolidWorks when it crashes?  Is it totally random or consistent on a certain type of task or model?

           

          Describe the work you do with SolidWorks in detail.

           

          We have worked off NAS for ever.  We never work local.  We do not have a lot of crashes.  I do know we have top notch network equipment.

           

          I have seen the quality of the power into a cubicle cause issues.   Dirty power in can make a system wonky.   FWIW....

            • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
              Eric Snyder

              Two use cases:

               

              1) Mostly they are simple assemblies. 5-7 top level part components and rarely any sub assemblies. In the past I have tried to make these assemblies be driven more by configurations, formulas and custom properties. With all my efforts to have things automatically driven and built it has usually ended up easier to just set things up by hand. Usually sketches in the part components will have some references to features in other parts in the assembly. It actually seems pretty simple to me. I keep a "template set" that gets Pack and Go'ed as a starting point. Really, quite a bit is automatically built already.

               

              2) Mechanical machine design. Currently I am working on an assembly that has 739 components, 110 total mates, 41 top level mates, 69 unique parts, 4 levels deep. I have been through many gyrations on this assembly with combining components into new sub assemblies. Almost every time a tech will suggest that new ways of building the assy I would try them but it doesn't seem to matter.

               

              I have UPS units coming for each work station. We have multiple power flickers both in spring/summer from thunderstorms and winter from ice storms.

            • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
              Logan Pegler

              Hi Eric,

               

              A "reasonable" number of crashes would depend heavily on what sort of projects you are doing and what you are trying to get the software to do. If you are doing simple sketches and machined parts I would certainly not expect it to crash as many times as if you were trying to work on large imported scanned geometry for example..

               

              Your reseller can get SolidWorks to produce a report that will summarise the nature of all crash reports you have submitted (the ones that appear straight after SolidWorks dies) and they should be able to use this information to determine what is frequently causing crashing for your users. Probably a good place to start. It is probably going to depend on how interested your VAR is in helping you as to guiding you in the direction to resolve them. Have you considered testing on new windows user profile accounts? Also we typically recommend a fresh install for each new version of SolidWorks, surely you have done a reinstall more than twice since 2007?

                • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                  Eric Snyder
                  Your reseller can get SolidWorks to produce a report that will summarise the nature of all crash reports you have submitted (the ones that appear straight after SolidWorks dies) and they should be able to use this information to determine what is frequently causing crashing for your users. Probably a good place to start.

                  Very interesting. We usually don't do Rx because the crashes are not repeatable. My strategy now is to do one EVERY TIME we have an issue. Our small voice is nothing to Solidworks. I figure that the VAR's need to press Solidworks to make things better.

                  Also we typically recommend a fresh install for each new version of SolidWorks, surely you have done a reinstall more than twice since 2007?

                  OS reinstall or SW install?

                    • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                      Anna Wood

                      Eric Snyder wrote:

                      OS reinstall or SW install?

                       

                      Both.....    We will refresh our systems every couple of years with a complete hard drive wipe and re-install of the OS and software.  Amazing amount of junk gets built up on computers over time.

                       

                      Does your IT department have you setup with roaming profiles on your domain?  Or any odd or onerous group policies with the Windows Active Directory into your companies Windows Domain?  How locked down are the virus protection and scanning on the network and local computer hard drives?

                  • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                    Peter De Vlieger

                    Eric,

                     

                    You failed to mention what version (year) you're using and what modules you're using.

                     

                    As others have said, if you are just using the basic commands then I wouldn't expect it to fail several times a month, let alone a day.

                    If however you're making intricate big assemblies while using routing and using imported models, etc.... then it can be rather volatile especially if the structure of your ASM is not streamlined.

                    • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                      Kim Henriksen

                      Hi Eric,

                       

                      We have the same story in our company. We changed to SolidWorks from SolidEdge back in 2004, and have been struggling ever since.

                      Still we see crashes and performance issues, every single day. Sometimes they vary a bit from every service release, and sometimes resolved issues comeback in the next release. As the admin, I sometimes spend more time trying to resolve the users problems than doing the work Im supposed to. If changing all our existing files to a different platform was an easy task, I wouldn't hesitate to pull the plug on SW.

                      To me it seems like SW is putting more effort to making fancy buttons and colors, than to make the basic functionality work. Who needs 5 annual releases, with the same bugs?

                      We constantly have open tickets in our VARs support system, some are transferred to SolidWorks, some are deleted and never resolved.

                      We all have monster computers to try to account for poor software performance, we changed all our network gear in an attempt to remove possible errors in IO. We moved the license server back in house to try to eliminate errors in communication from our hosting center.

                      We had numerous network surveillance jobs set up to try to catch the culprit, but none of our efforts has made it a happy marriage.

                      In my opinion, there is not a thing here called reasonable number of crashes. This software didn't come for free. If you buy a new TV, would you accept it to crash daily, or show the pictures in half speed 10% of the time?

                        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                          Ryan McVay

                          Kim Henriksen Geez. Looks like you jumped aboard the "popular" band wagon in 2004. Looking at Solid Edge and comparing it to SW these days is difficult. Kinda like comparing a pedal bicycle to VW Passat. SE being the Passat. See the only comparison these days is that both have a steering column, rubber tires (not the same amount but tires) and a braking mechanism. You could have gone the NX route and then we'd be talking about a bicycle and a bullet train (integrated modules- c'mon I thought that would be very clever..that is if you know about NX and its capabilities.)

                          Did you know that Solid Edge can take a SW drafting file and recreate it in Solid Edge drafting? Bamm, your transition has just been made simpler. :-)

                        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                          John Stoltzfus

                          Should I say it or shouldn't I - well here it goes - I blame crashes on mostly user error or a sporadic workflow, which include circular rebuilds, equations and configurations references more than one level deep, large design tables, complicated in context designs using faces or planes from multiple assemblies, interrupting a long rebuilds and those are just off the top of my head, there's a good chance of more reasons....

                           

                          Using SolidWorks try to simplify your workflow and avoid the above and your assemblies health and your health will get better, lol

                            • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                              Ryan McVay

                              John Stoltzfus John, if we simplify our design intent what's the point of SW providing deeper functionality? Are you telling me that they don't test their software and just release new functions without seeing how users might actually implement the new functions? OR see how new functions might interact with old functions? Don't answer those!!

                              I'm fighting a simple problem today. New workstation only has Windows 7 and Office 2010 installed...SW bombs on the 2013 install..go figure...it's not the first time and won't be the last. We just have to live with it.

                              __________________

                              10/21/2013: Update on installing SW 2013 on new hardware.

                              Well, with about a day of beating my head against the keyboard and getting reprimanded for foul language (kidding but I probably should have been) I was able to get SW to finally install. After starting with just installing the core SW module and then adding in the rest of the modules a couple at a time it came down to the 3DtoScan "module". For some reason this "module" would cause the installation to fail at 65%. Go figure. I really did get tired of uninstalling and reinstalling all the C++ redistribution updates every time for a "clean" install, though.

                                • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                  Eric Snyder

                                  I kind of agree with you here. Solidworks sells itself on a lot of functionality. You can make components change and adapt depending on what other components are. In my case one of the things I did with this current design is go in and take out all the external references. In other words...if I want component A to adapt in length to what component B is then I either need to make external references inside component A to component B or use an overall driving sketch that both components reference to.

                                   

                                  Here is my complaint here...The ability to have components drive one another is really cool. It does no good however when you are forced to dumb down that feature because it is suspected of causing issues. It's as if Solidworks makes a lot of promises and shows some cool parametric features and then when you are actually naive enough to use them  your VAR tells you that they are causing you issues - make your design simpler, get rid of those advanced features.

                                    • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                      Ryan McVay

                                      That is why you purchase your 3rd party software like DriveWorks to do the real automation processes that SW just can't handle on its own. And for clarification DW is a fabulous tool. We use it non-stop and have even deployed 9 different product configurations to our sales group (50+ sales people) to use.

                                       

                                      My point is you have to invest in other tools to get the promise from DS/SW.

                                    • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                      John Stoltzfus

                                      Ryan McVay

                                       

                                      I know the frustration of major assemblies blowing up - I remember opening files that were good when they were done and two years later you open them up and there's errors all over, I remember using configurations extensively and models being incorrect at the back end because of the way SW rebuilds files, I remember using tons of equations and then they somehow screw up, I can open old files here and no surprise if the entire feature tree has errors, the list could go on...

                                       

                                      But I know now that simplifying the approach and being forced to learn new techniques, thinking outside of the SW box, life can be awesome, assemblies & parts are robust, parametric changes, complex designs............. now life is good and I can only know of the frustrations because I was there and done that and now I am actually having fun designing with SW.

                                        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                          Ryan McVay

                                          John Stoltzfus You know me, I'll never be happy until I'm using NX/UG again. SW has a big toolset but they don't work so well. Like you mention, the hammer and screwdriver and box-end wrenches all work great. It's all the rest of the tools that will make you project a nightmare. I'm just one that looks at the cost of the software and maintenance and compare the functionality and stability to NX and I can't just figure out how people come to the conclusion that SW has the ROI.

                                           

                                           

                                          From a corporate/business point of view your CAD data is you business asset. If that asset is good one day and requires rework the next day your asset isn't that valuable to the company. That means it would take a long time to build your ROI using these tools. Making the investment in a "high-end" tool provides the ROI your business needs in a shorter time frame. And let's not mention you don't have to deal with a VAR for support. If you have an issue you call Siemens PLM Global Access Tech Center (GTAC) directly, submit your logs directly, get your answers or status directly. Granted you can still work thru your VAR but direct access is a blessing.

                                           

                                          For me having supported and trained NX in global companies, the investments you make in NX far outweigh the cash you pour into SW for a software that almost works- SolidAlmostWorks. I know I've used that one for years..but I feel it is an accurate assessment of the software.

                                           

                                          I agree that if you keep your models simple, keep your drawings simple with referencing only the data in the part or assembly you are detailing is the way to go. But as I mention it's slow to get any ROI when you can't rely on the rest of the software to do the design automation and utilize design intent or heaven forbid attempt to reuse your models for other projects/designs.

                                           

                                          Popular doesn't mean better. And all this sales talk of all these resources that already know how to use the software kill me. No, there are a lot of people who think they know how to use the software. Not to mention I/we don't hire based on how well you know a CAD software but how you go about solving problems for the business.

                                           

                                           

                                          OK...my two minutes are up and I'll get off my soap box..Donald do you have any comments?

                                      • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                        Eric Snyder

                                        This seems really plausible and reasonable. When we crash it is almost never reproducible. Many times it is because we had the nerve to actually click on something while we are waiting. It's like Solidworks is doing a bunch of plate spinning like to old performers on Ed Sullivan and the additional click distracted Solidworks and that caused it to drop all the spinning plates. The crash happens IMMEDIATELY when we click.

                                         

                                        The post above is right. The mouse cursor much of the time is undependable. You start a command and the icon flashes a few times. After the icon flashes (or doesn't do anything) and you click not knowing if it is finished it changes to a "waiting on something to finish spinner" icon.

                                         

                                        Second monitors will be on order today - they are so cheap these days.

                                      • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                        Rick Becker

                                            1) What in your opinion is a reasonable number of crashes that one can expect using Solidworks?

                                         

                                        None. Any crash, caused by SolidWorks and not a hardware issue, is unreasonable.

                                         

                                        Saving a file with no errors and having the tree blow-up the tenth time you open the file is unreasonable as well.

                                         

                                        Having cryptic error messages are unreasonable as well.

                                        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                          Glenn Schroeder

                                          1) What in your opinion is a reasonable number of crashes that one can expect using Solidworks?

                                          I suppose what's reasonable will differ between individuals.  I'd think any thing over once or twice a day is too many.  I go weeks without a crash, though that hasn't always been the case.  My models aren't particularly complex, I don't use many external references, I use sub-assemblies to keep the number of top level mates reasonable, and I almost never work with imported geometry.  And I keep my sketches simple.  I remember someone posting here a while ago complaining that SW had crashed and he'd lost over an hour of work.  When I asked why he hadn't saved in an hour he explained that he'd been working in a single sketch that whole time.  I'm not surprised he had a crash.

                                           

                                          2) In your opinion - for those that have moved from network storage to PDM standard or Professional, has that improved your crashes?

                                          I've never used any type of PDM, just Windows Explorer on a network.  From reading posts here from others it sometimes seems that crashes are increased using PDM, instead of the opposite.

                                           

                                          3) Have any of you had a similar story? If so, were you able to get the crashing resolved? If so, how?

                                          The only times I've had recurring crashes I've been able to link it to specific behavior.  Including one memorable instance a few years ago (SW2013, I believe) where it would crash every time I clicked on a Toolbox part in an Assembly without a command active.  Apparently that was a little trick SW had saved just for me, because I posted here and no one else had seen it.  I removed the Toolbox designation from my Parts and moved on.

                                          • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                            Jim Steinmeyer

                                            One thing I would ask is " how much training have your designers had?" I know that parts of this software is intuitive and that experienced designers give assistance to those newer to the software. I also know that most training appears unreasonably expensive but, the software is constantly being tweaked and receiving enhancements (some good some bad). Also we can fall into bad habits that can cause crashes due to our work processes. Sometimes that neat trick we like to use causes more instability resulting in crashes.

                                            I am not much of a fan of the canned training as it always seems that at least 1/2 of the time is spent on subjects you never use in your company. However your VAR should be able to take a couple of your larger , common models and come up with something that would pertain to your needs. I know Alin Vargatu did some of that when he was working on his large assembly demonstration. That allows them to both suggest best practices for areas you are working on, and to critique the techniques you are currently using. It could be very enlightening.

                                            • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                              Peter Benoit

                                              Solidworks would crash for me what would seem like 5 times a day working within weldments and then it would be fine for a month and then crash again. We could not figure out what was wrong with the program or computer or if it was the graphics card itself. We ended up getting a new hardware and so far seems to work better.

                                               

                                              The only thing I could really suggest is that you save often until the problem is figured out, it really shouldn't crash at all. That and make sure you have a good graphics card and driver helps.

                                               

                                              I wish you luck!

                                              • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                Kim Henriksen

                                                Sorry but I have the instant need to air my frustrations :-D

                                                This is how my day started. I got in the office 45min ago, during that period SW crashed without warning while mating two parts in an assembly. No autorecover file present, a two days old backup file. We learned the lesson years ago and dont use the "fancy" abilities like external references and so on. We do define our sketches and limit configurations and try to mate everything to planes instead of features. Yesterday opened an assembly that I have been working in for a long time, to find a completely lit Christmas tree of yellow triangles. Having to spend the rest of the day trying to find the one or two mates thats causing everything to suddenly fall apart, just seems like........well, I would rather hit my finger with a hammer.

                                                First crash of the day followed by an email from our VARs support, telling me that they close yet another ticket, because they failed to solve the problem, that we have files in our WPDM that cannot be moved or deleted.

                                                I suggest changing the name to SolidWorkssometimes... 

                                                • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                  Paul Risley

                                                  In this conversation I have seen a lot of my early frustrations with Solidworks. The crashing, spinning blue wheel of death and the like. I still see these along with other fun things in Solidworks. About 3-4 years ago I had the chance to sit in with a VAR training led session on virtual models(assemblies and parts), top down design and in context building.[You know the things SW is supposed to be good at]. The tips and tools we learned were very useful and I still use to this day. The computer did crash a couple of times on the assemblies with multiple virtual parts and assemblies in them. The instructor said that depending on multiple factors this could change the amount of crashes.

                                                   

                                                  My frustration is smaller today than it was years ago, but I still have crashes. The very best thing I did was I purchased a program"Backup maker" which every 2 weeks creates a full backup of my directory of Solidworks and customer files and every day it does a partial backup which it picks out only the files that have been added or modified since the last backup done.

                                                  This has saved many a project because at worst case I only lose 1 days worth of material. Since I am lead designer and project manager as well as the IT guy for my company I have to try and stay in front of the crashes and things that will disrupt our companies schedules.

                                                   

                                                  I would like to see zero crashes and for the most part that is the case, however when they happen they seem to have no rhyme or reason. I hope you guys find a solution to your crashes, because I know it is frustrating as hell.

                                                  • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                    Eric Snyder

                                                    Wow...didn't mean to touch off a firestorm. After a few more days of thought, experience and seeing posts here I'll let go of a few thoughts...

                                                     

                                                    1) My VAR is saying that they are seeing a trend with NTDLL.DLL. They don't understand it's role in Solidworks and is new to them which is fine. It's extremely complicated software and no one will understand everything. They have kicked the support issue up to Solidworks. Hopefully we will start making progress???

                                                     

                                                    2) As a part time programmer I am often amazed/blown away/wow'ed at what 3D cad can do. The ability to describe complex surfaces and render them on screen in the blink of the eye, mates, threads, components, BOM's. The list goes on and on. It really is a marvel of the late 20th century that has made design and engineering more accessable to the visual personalities rather than just the extremely left brained command line lovers out there. Pretty amazing.

                                                     

                                                    3) From my perspective Solidworks had a hit on their hands and obviously a lot of people have embraced it over the years. When we bought in it was far cheaper than ProE or Catia and it was VERY, VERY visual.

                                                     

                                                    4) Over the years I have seen a lot of new products rolled out by Solidworks/Dassault. All you need to do is go to 3D CAD Design Engineering Software Tools | SOLIDWORKS  to get an idea of all the products they have come out with. It seems that their effort is going toward product development rather than stability. I might say as well that almost all these products are nowhere near the ballpark of hitting my needs with the possible exception of a vault and simulation.

                                                     

                                                    5) Thinking about the kinds of support contacts I have had I think that crashes are kind of swept under the rug. My guess here is that the root cause is out of the hands of the VAR's and in Solidworks hands. The VAR tech support efforts (not sure if this is an intentional strategy or unconscious) tends toward dumbing down how we use Solidworks toward simpler models an away from the features that Solidworks sells itself on. What good is that??? Don't get me wrong, my experience with my VAR tech support people is that they are a bunch of really smart users that know the product well and are always willing to help, teach and generally try to get you going. I think the problem is out of their hands. If they could fix it I think they would.

                                                      • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                        John Stoltzfus

                                                        Eric Snyder  -  Great explanations - Unfortunately for a lot of users SW oversells it self big time, roll out events are full of those "New" amped up "See this" moments -

                                                         

                                                        Since SW has been providing an affordable 3D and that in itself opens up another can of worms, guys like me are now trying to do all kinds of designs without the IQ to even understand it, $25,000 per seat does a quick sweep and excludes a lot of people, $5 K now more people can afford it.  and yes I don't see any issue in dumbing down your workflow, that doesn't mean dumbing down your designs, it means better designs quicker & easier, with less stress, don't see what the issue is .

                                                          • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                            Ryan McVay

                                                            $25K was the 80s-90s pricing. That was one of the good results of SW..it brought down the investment cost of software like NX and CATIA. I believe, you can get into NX for about $12K for Mach II Product Design bundle depending on the reseller you are dealing with. The functionality you get there is like adding SW premium with about three to four additional 3rd party software.

                                                             

                                                            I just got this email this morning from Engineering.com for those of you that are looking at Surface Pro or Surface Book. Ignore the other part of the ad. My point being some companies are making strategic partnerships.- Sorry had to do a redacted version of the Microsoft ad.

                                                             

                                                            Capture.PNG

                                                        • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                          Shawn Casebolt

                                                          Throw in my 2 cents here:  I have found that when SW or driveworks is crashing on me I do 2 things that usually clear it up.

                                                          1) clear my local EPDM cache

                                                          2) Run SWRX and clear the temp files etc..

                                                           

                                                          Not that this will be a magic bullet, but if I start noticing issues I do those  2 things and it usually clears up.

                                                          • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                            David Nelson

                                                            Not sure I can remember having any crashes since going to 2016 Sp4.  This is way better than 15 was.

                                                            • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                              Eric Snyder

                                                              Well...interesting.

                                                               

                                                              I took a brand new clean machine and installed a fresh copy of W7 and SW 2016 SP4. I am still getting crashes, maybe not as often. Some of the crashes are when trying to mate parts in an assembly with 20 - 30 parts. Some were trying to apply a custom mesh in simulation, some are random.

                                                               

                                                              I have escalated from first line tech support to tech support supervisor and now to a VP at the VAR. We'll see what happens. So far there have been no improvements from any VAR tech support efforts against the crashing issue and only vague promises made from the VAR but no consistent follow through.

                                                               

                                                              Signed,

                                                              frustrated

                                                              • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                                Eric Snyder

                                                                I find this interesting. I have a completely new W7 computer and new install of 2016 SP4 and it was crashing. Not only crashing but I could not package Rx reports, it would silently fail.

                                                                 

                                                                Bottom line is I had imported settings from another machine. We performed a procedure to delete registry settings and that fixed both issues. When this registry reset happens Solidworks rebuilds a default set of settings.

                                                                 

                                                                What I learned:

                                                                 

                                                                Bad paths in your setting could be causing crashing in Solidworks.

                                                                When you import settings from another machine you could be importing bad paths on the new machine - that could cause crashing.

                                                                There is not enough checking for bad paths in the Solidworks import settings wizard.

                                                                 

                                                                Allegedly, I am supposed to get getting some time with Solidworks directly. I plan on bringing this up. My opinion is that you should never be able to bring in settings for paths without some way to check for bad paths and correct them.

                                                                 

                                                                I do not know yet if resetting the registry on the old machine would fix it as well. At this point I am afraid to try since I have what seems to be a stable machine.

                                                                • Re: Solidworks Crashing - What is normal and acceptable?
                                                                  James Riddell

                                                                  Solidworks crashing?

                                                                  Normal - yes.

                                                                  Acceptable - no.