2 Replies Latest reply on Sep 21, 2016 9:33 AM by Jim Sculley

    What is the difference between checking out a file and opening a file - PDM Standard

    Eric Snyder

      So...Experimenting with PDM Standard as a way to reduce crashes. I would like to confirm my understanding of a couple of basic concepts. Hopefully doing this here will help others. My understanding of checking out a file vs opening a file from the PDM vault is this:

       

      Checking out a file: The vault copies the file to my local drive and marks it as checked out by me. I can make changes to the file and save them. When I am finished editing the file I can check the file in at the end and the revision is incremented. All revisions of the file are saved so that I can roll back to a previous version of necessary.

       

      Opening a file: I open a file from the vault and the file is copied to my local drive. I cannot make changes to this file and save it as it is marked read only. It is like getting a copy of the file to work with temporarily.

       

      Is this correct?

        • Re: What is the difference between checking out a file and opening a file - PDM Standard
          Craig Schultz

          Yep....

           

          Opening the file: Just puts them in a local cache on your hard drive.  Faster opening if you decide to open it again before clearing your local cache.

           

          Checking out a file: Allows only you to make changes/prevents others from working on it at the same time.  You can also "undo check out" if you rethink things.

           

          Checking in: It will notify others of the changes if they are working on an assembly with the part in it, they can then 'get latest'.  It bumps the version in the vault.  It allows others to check out the file and work on it if needed.  You can also "check in but keep checked out" so that you can do rolling changes through the design process.  That way everyone is kept up to date with changes over longer periods of time.

          • Re: What is the difference between checking out a file and opening a file - PDM Standard
            Jim Sculley

            Eric Snyder wrote:

             

            So...Experimenting with PDM Standard as a way to reduce crashes. I would like to confirm my understanding of a couple of basic concepts. Hopefully doing this here will help others. My understanding of checking out a file vs opening a file from the PDM vault is this:

             

            Checking out a file: The vault copies the file to my local drive and marks it as checked out by me.

            The file is only copied to your local drive if the 'Get Latest Version' checkbox is selected, which it usually is by default.  Checking out a file simply marks the file in the database as checked out.  The getting of the latest version is what actually copies the file from the server to your local vault view.  They are two independent operations that are often performed together during check out due to the default settings of the Check Out dialog box.  You can perform each separately though.  For instance, you can right click on a file and 'Get Latest Version' to simply copy the latest version from the vault to your local vault view.  Or you can clear the 'Get Latest Version' column in the check out dialog to prevent the version on the server from being copied to your local view.  Why would you want to do this you might ask.

             

            Imagine this scenario:

             

            1. You work on a file and check it in at the end of the day.  At this point file on the server and the file on your hard drive are identical.
            2. The next day you start making major changes to the file without checking it out.  At the same time, someone else checks the file out makes a minor change and checks it back in.
            3. If you then check the file out and don't clear the Get Latest Version checkbox, your local copy with the major changes will be overwritten by the server copy with the minor changes.  Ouch.  Luckily, SOLIDWORKS will warn you that your local copy has changes that will be overwritten, but when users are first starting with EPDM they tend to not understand this warning and end up overwriting their changes.  They quickly learn that the proper sequence is to check the file out before doing any work.

            Your only option to resolve the above conflict is to get with your coworker to determine whose changes are more painful to recreate.  Since your changes were more significant, you would check the file out, but clear the Get Latest Version checkbox and then check in your local copy.  Then your co-worker would have to recreate their changes and you would have to buy them lunch so they don't hate you.

             

             

            When I am finished editing the file I can check the file in at the end and the revision is incremented. All revisions of the file are saved so that I can roll back to a previous version of necessary.

            Don't confuse versions with revisions.  They are two different things.  Every check in creates a new version, starting at 1 and incrementing by one each time.  Revisions occur when the workflow specifies that a transition causes the revision to increment and the destination state has a revision scheme assigned to it.  The revision scheme is very arbitrary.  It could start at 0 or A or 42 and increment by 0 or 1 or -1 or 10.

             

            Eric Snyder wrote:

             

            Opening a file: I open a file from the vault and the file is copied to my local drive. I cannot make changes to this file and save it as it is marked read only. It is like getting a copy of the file to work with temporarily.

             

            Is this correct?

            You can make all the changes you want to a file even though it isn't checked out, since you are working on a local copy.  You cannot save those changes until you check the file out.  Making changes without first checking the file out may result in you frequently buying people lunch if you work in an environment where multiple people typically work with the same files.