12 Replies Latest reply on Jul 20, 2016 12:53 AM by Christian Chu

    Project numbers

    David Turjeman

      Hello everyone, i'm new here and hoping to get an answer even though im not sure it is the right place to ask:

      We have several products that are almost the same. Say we have a three machines, and the differences between them are 3-4 small parts at different assembly levels. Or maybe we use all the same parts but we place them at different positions. The purchesing dept. at my company is mad for me to open new product number for each machine because to them it looks exactly the same. Did any of you have this problem? What did you do? Any suggestion will help.

       

      David Turjeman

        • Re: Project numbers
          Christian Chu

          add dash and number (-XX) for each

          • Re: Project numbers
            John Stoltzfus

            The key word here is "almost"  - either a part is different or not - if it's the same identical part no number change...

              • Re: Project numbers
                David Turjeman

                And if it is just a little bit different? 3 parts of 4000 are not the same? New product number?

                  • Re: Project numbers
                    Arthur McRae

                    If anything is different it's still different.  Unless one of the new products is replacing an old legacy product in which case my company insists on re-using the same product number (it drives me nuts but they get paid more than me...).  I would if the part usage is as you say 4000 to 3 ratio have configurations, giving the assemblies an alpha numeric identifier.  P19494-A01, P18654-C03
                    The reality of the situation is this: you are the one familiar with your company policies or making them, you are the one who gets/has to choose how to handle it.  What will work best in the long run?
                    My 5 cents (seemed like a bit more than 2)

                    • Re: Project numbers
                      John Stoltzfus

                      Personally I would make a "New Part Number" if there is even a minor difference.  For example make a new component in SW and save it, then in a few weeks you have a very similar project that needs a part that is "almost" identical to the one you did a few weeks before, open up the part and make your changes and save over the original component. Do that for a few years, and then suppose a client calls and want's a replacement part for their original equipment and over the past few years 10 changes were done, same part number, which one will you send?

                       

                      The only allowable reason to not change the part number and that is jumping revisions and tracking all those changes, that assures that the part you made a few years ago is going to fit.  Those changes were tracked and accounted for, with the past and current pcs of equipment..

                  • Re: Project numbers
                    Dennis Dohogne

                    Part/project numbers are a small price to pay for the convenience of avoiding mistakes.  Most ERP systems allow you to copy a BOM from one assembly to make a new one then edit the few numbers necessary for the new machine.  Make new numbers.  If you want to indicate these things belong to the same family with only a few differences then use a base number for the family with dash numbers to indicate the particular one, as Christian Chu said.

                    • Re: Project numbers
                      Brian Hoerner

                      David,

                       

                           We create a new project/product number for each product, but if that product uses the same parts as another product, the part numbers stay the same if there is no difference in the part.

                       

                           This is because if a product is different only in the way, or position it uses the same parts, then it is a different product that uses the same parts in a different manner.

                       

                      my2cts

                      • Re: Project numbers
                        David Turjeman

                        Thank you all.

                        the answers you gave are all similar to what me and the rest of the engineering dept. think, and totally different then what people from managing departments from other companies i talked to think.

                         

                        Thanks!

                        • Re: Project numbers
                          Dave Laban

                          Next time they ask for a coffee, use a tablespoon of granules and a teaspoon of water.  It's the same components so it's the same thing, right?

                           

                          They'll understand after that.