7 Replies Latest reply on Jul 5, 2016 5:22 PM by Dan Sevier

    3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes

    Dan Sevier

      I am trying to complete an exercise in Paul Tran's book, Solidworks 2015: Advanced Techniques, page 1-12 to 1-13.  Please see thie video, where I try to do this exercise. (SW file also attached).

       

      I am having trouble making 3D sketches on custom reference planes (and transitioning between the reference planes with the sketch parts.) In the exercise, I have to 3d sketch between the top plane, and plane 1, and plane 2. I guess I was able to make the first line on the top plane, the first line on plane 2, and the next line on plane 1, but then I cannot go any further.

       

      I am using Solidworks 2016. In the textbook, it says that if I hold the CONTROL key, it will switch between the reference planes, but this is not working. However. the TAB key does alternate between the default planes (right, front, top), so that does work correctly.

       

      Would someone please help me to tell me how to properly do this?

       

      I've tried double-clicking on the plane and continuing the 3d sketch, but this is not placing the sketch on the correct plane. I tried adding a relation of On Plane, but this only sometimes worked, and I could not merge the endpoints with the prior line on the other plane.

       

      Please help. Thanks.

        • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes
          Barry Morris

          Dan

           

          I was having the same issue. There is a video on My Solidworks that explains this situation. Before you can go from one plane to the next make a coincident constraint between the end of the last completed entity and the plane you wish to start sketching on. If the entity does not go all the way to the plane you want to place your next sketch entity on, the sketch will be created parallel to the sketch plane at the point in 3D space where the entity end point that you pick on is located. To activate the sketch plane you are going to start the next entity on, hold the "Control" key and left click on the new plane you are going to sketch on. (HINT: Rotate your model so that you can clearly see what sketch plane you are selecting or use multiple windows)

          • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes
            John Stoltzfus

            When using 3D sketches it helps to keep a few things in mind...

             

            1. Understand the XYZ relations

             

             

            2. You need to manually manipulate the lines, they are basically a floating line with no anchor points or planes, once drawn you need to apply relations - To establish a relationship to a plane select an end point and the plane and select the "On Plane" icon

             

              • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes

                Best practice should be to activate a plane and sketch on that plane so that "on plane" relations are added to the entities as you sketch them as much as possible. Other relations and dimensions can then be added to further constrain the geometry you create. Any time that you have to go back and manually manipulate and entity you are costing yourself time. Try to develop your sketches in such a fashion that it will minimize manual manipulation. The software is designed for this purpose. One thing to always remember when modeling any part is that you want to model with the fewest features possible that will still allow for enough flexibility in your design in case you need to go back and modify feature/s without causing down stream failures. This likewise applies to sketches as well. Keep the sketches as simple as possible and make them so they are easy to manipulate. By establishing on plane relations, you will find that defining the geometry will be much less time consuming and easier to control. The web address shown below will take you to you to the video I mentioned before when pasted into you search bar.   http://my.solidworks.com/training/master/45/3d-sketching There is also a good vid on youtube by Kevin Hollbrook at CADimensions Inc.

                  • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes
                    John Stoltzfus

                    Good points - we're talking 3D sketches not 2D - activating a plane means you're making a 2D sketch, not? - definitely agree with your comments above, however if your talking 3D sketches that can vary with the overall design, if you pick plane to position your lines then you don't need a 3D sketch, you can do it much easier and quicker with a 2D sketch.  Like I mentioned above, drawing a line in 3D, you're drawing a line in space, yeah, definitely the starting point can be anchored but not the rest unless you're drawing from line point to line point or to a point, just picking a plane won't lock it down, because you would be able to move the line point/vertex across the surface of the plane.  How many designs did you make using 3D sketches??, just my 2 cents.....

                • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes

                  To the point of Dan's original question, look at the videos. They explain everything I have stated. Obviously I am no guru, otherwise I probably wouldn't be reading and using the same book that caused the original question. However, when offering information to other people, I tend to lean on the expertise of people more knowledgeable than myself. In this case the information was pulled directly from sources that I have stated previously. (These videos are by other SolidWorks professionals) These two sources answered the original question for me completely. I hope that this will help anyone that was as confused as I was with this issue. Much thanks to all who have posted videos and tutorials about SolidWorks. Most of them have been a great help in learning the software over the past several years.

                  • Re: 3d sketching on oblique intersecting planes
                    Dan Sevier

                    Thanks John and Barry!  I will give it a try.  Have a great week!