1 Reply Latest reply on May 23, 2016 11:52 AM by Jeff Sweeney

    Renaming in WPDM - Upper Case

    John Wayman

      Being the incompetent that I am, I saved 2 parts as 'mcpxxxxxx.sldprt' instead of 'MCPxxxxxx.sldprt' (x is a digit between 0 and 9).

      Not a problem, I thought, I'll rename them in the vault.

      I was right: It wasn't a problem with the first one. The second one, however, seems to have a lower case memory.

      I changed the name of the 2nd part, in the vault, to 'MCPxxxxxx.sldprt' and hit checkout and open.

      The drawing still showed the part number in lower case.

      I opened the part and looked at the properties. The part number ($PRP:"SW-File Name") was evaluated as lower case.

      I changed the part number in the vault to 'junk.sldprt' and repeated the exercise. The drawing showed the part number as 'junk'.

      I changed the part number in the vault to 'MCCPxxxxxx' and repeated the exercise. The drawing showed the part number as 'MCCPxxxxxx'. Success! Or was it?

      I renamed the part in the vault again, by deleting one of the letters 'C' in the name, checked out and opened: guess what? It's back as 'mcpxxxxxx' on the drawing. What's that about?

      I am using SW2014 SP5, with Workgroup PDM. The operating system is Windows 7.

      Is it really any wonder I miss Pro/E and Intralink every single working day? They may be 'harder to learn', but they are at least rational and repeatable in their behaviour.

      This thing doesn't even behave the same when you do the same thing twice.

      Yes, I am frustrated, having spent 3 hours so far trying to rename 2 simple part files, even more frustrated because I know it was my fault they were wrong in the first place.

      I just wish something about SW and WPDM would simply work, without being intrusive and making the tool more important than the job.

       

      Anyway, rant aside, I would appreciate a step-by-step description of how I should go about changing the case of my part number.

       

      I accept the responsibility for not repeating the initial incompetence is mine.

       

       

      Thanks,

      John