AnsweredAssumed Answered

Animation and Rendering

Question asked by Robert Voitik on May 4, 2016
Latest reply on May 5, 2016 by Iain Hendry

I have a 70.5 second animation of a Solidworks Assembly. I must deliver this *.avi at 30 fps in photo-realistic quality using Photoview360. When rendering, I have to break-up this 70.5 second video into shorter segments. I break the total video into shorter time periods because I cannot wait for what will turn out to be 5 to 10 days of total rendering time, possibly to find some kind of error or bad rendering. I also feel that my graphics capable computer and the rendering engines may not handle that much data. I have had "data loss" errors or "odd" movements in some rendered videos. It took weeks to find the proper combination of settings, backgrounds, methods, and proper CODEC to get everybody to work together successfully. This was despite perfect and quick rendering in the simpler Solidworks renderer.

 

The animation is attached on the Motion Study 2 tab of the file called "Assy of Parts - Rev23O".

 

I tried to include the first two *.avi files but they are too large as listed below. I can provide those photo-realistic videos if necessary.

 

For the Time Period 0 - 20 seconds, I set the rendering to the settings below.

These  20 seconds took 32 hours to render.

This file size ended up at 1,331,138 KB - Is this a proper size for this short video?

1,331,138 KB / {(20 sec. x 30 fps ) + 1 frame } = 2214.87 KB/frame

     "No"

For the Time Period 20 - 32 seconds, I set the rendering to the settings below.

These 12 seconds took 44 hours.

This file size ended up at 799,570 KB - Is this a proper size for this short video?

799,570 KB / {(12 sec. x 30 fps ) + 1 frame } = 2214.87 KB/frame (equal to the prior render).

"No"

For the Time Period 32 - 44 seconds, I set the rendering to the settings below. These 12 seconds are scheduled to take over 53 hours per status menu below:

 

"No"

 

Can anyone please help me find out how to better at rendering time?

 

How can we improve these lengthy rendering times without buying and employing additional computers and setting up a farm?

 

Thanks for any input.

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