3 Replies Latest reply on Oct 24, 2007 1:34 AM by Ian Hogg

    Gravity

    James  Sidgwick

      I'm attempting to model the effects of having a smalllightweight ball in a flow to see what happens. The ball needs toreact to gravity and the flow, as well as the surrounding objects.How might I go about doing this? Will this take up a lot of memorywhen I model it? Any help would be appreciated

      Thanks,

      James
        • Gravity
          Ian Hogg
          Hi James,

          This really depends on what your goal is.
          If you are interested in seeing where the ball travels in the flow, and you can assume that it has no impact the flow (ie just along for the ride), then you can use a particle study to inject spheres of a certain mass and size into the flow and watch where they go based on inertia, gravity, flow velocity, etc.

          If this is like the ball valve in a shop vac, then it cannot be modeled where it moves as a function of time (and force/pressure) during a simulation. FloWorks assumes that the meshed parts stay in place during a simulation (Rotating regions use a rotational coordinate system to work around this).

          Cheers,

          Ian
            • Gravity
              James  Sidgwick

              Thanks a lot Ian. That clarifies it a lot. The balls I am usingare part of a valve system. Is it possible to determine the forcesacting on the balls to see how the balls would react to theflow?

              James

                • Gravity
                  Ian Hogg
                  Hi James,

                  It is very straight forward to determine the forces acting on the balls for a given geometry configuration. It is worth creating a goal to measure this and ensure convergence on the result.

                  Now there are some options you have with parameter studies to find a certain position for the balls. For example, vary a flow parameter or geometry parameter to reach a goal (eg. a certain force on an object or some other result). Very similar to optimization in COSMOSWorks.

                  Cheers,

                  Ian