8 Replies Latest reply on Nov 24, 2015 12:26 PM by Charley Saint

    Folder structures in EPDM

    Wayne Easton

      We initially made a decision to create a limited number of EPDM folders. We have two folders which will contain the majority of our CAD files rather than many folders with less CAD content. We are finding that EPDM has become extremely slow. Opening these folders takes a long time, etc.

       

      Now this can also be attributed to our server which is evidently running pretty much near its maximum capacity but I understand that the idea of having few folders with lots of content may also cause this issue. We will be upgrading our server hardware, however, the question I have is will this be enough or should we also be using more folders and less content in each folder?

       

      Thanks,

      Wayne

        • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
          Charley Saint

          Hey Wayne,

           

          Do you have an estimate on how many files are actually in your large folder? I've found that a properly maintained SQL server tends to provide better performance than anything else. Do you know if you've setup a SQL maintenance plan?

            • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
              Wayne Easton

              Currently there are probably just short of 6000 files but that will grow substantially as this folder will eventually hold all of our legacy data from about the last 10-15 years.

               

              I was told by a few people that regardless of what we do with our server we will start to experience delays as the columns in the folder will take longer to update with the metadata from all the files listed in that column.

                • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                  John Watkins

                  Wayne,

                   

                  I have to agree with Charley Saint.  We had some major lag going on some of our folders.  I worked with our VAR and got a PDF for SQL Performance Tuning, and that has helped dramatically in getting the performance back to how it was when the vault first came online.

                    • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                      Wayne Easton

                      Hi there John,

                       

                      Thanks for your reply. What sort of size are your larger files in EPDM? Is there any chance you still have that PDF available and wouldn't mind sharing it?

                       

                      Thanks

                        • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                          John Watkins

                          Wayne,

                           

                          Some of the folders in our vault have 60K+ files.  No single file is extremely large.  The biggest thing we found, was our database was fragmented pretty bad and that is what caused most of our issues.  Once we got our database on a maintenance plan to re-index and reorganize each week it made a huge difference.

                           

                          Let me do some searching for the document.  I have been through a few computers since that issue.

                          • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                            Jim Sculley

                            One good (and free) book on SQL Server Maintenance can be found here.

                             

                            Jim S.

                            • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                              Charley Saint

                              Hey Wayne,

                               

                              The basics:

                               

                              The only 2 things you really need to worry about are that you've setup simple recovery mode (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189272.aspx ) and make sure you have a maintenance plan (https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191002(v=sql.110).aspx  )with rebuild indexes and full database backup setup to run daily.

                               

                              The deets:

                               

                              MSSQL database consist of 2 files, the data (mdb) and the transaction log (ldf). Every operation that modifies the database gets logged in the ldf and it can easily grow much faster than the data. There's not much to gain from keeping it around however but SQL keeps it by default. The best way to get rid of it is to set your database into simple recovery mode then run a full backup against it. That will clear the log every time a backup occurs, but it won't shrink the log file so it will still appear to be very large unless you run a shrink task against it (https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178037(v=sql.105).aspx )

                               

                              Rebuilding an index will run through and clean up all the fragmentation inside the indexes. Often you will see that you should setup reorganize index tasks but thats meant for much larger datasets than EPDM. The difference is the reorganize task won't take your data offline so it's good to run while the system is in use, but it's not as effective as a rebuild. If you have a reorganize and a rebuild in the same maintenance plan then you're just tidying up your indexes, then deleting them and starting them over from scratch. Rebuilding does everything reorg does and more, but users can't access the data while it's running unless you're running an edition of SQL server that doesn't come with EPDM.

                               

                              Hope that helps.

                      • Re: Folder structures in EPDM
                        Pacquelet Yoan

                        Hi Wayne

                        In my company we 2 different CAD system (Autocad and Solidworks). We have EPDM with 50 folders with 3000 files in each, Autocad files are stored on non EPDM server with the same folder structure and number of files.

                        What I can say is that we access to Autocad folders without delay, in epdm access time can be more than 1 minute.

                        So I think a healthy SQL server is important. Unfortunately I'm not admin and I don't know what is our SQL maintenance plan.

                        John can you provide your PDF ?