11 Replies Latest reply on Sep 19, 2007 2:17 PM by Matt Lombard

    Complex Technical Surfaces

    Matt Lombard
      I'm looking for ideas for some models of complex technical surfaces, stuff like compressor vanes, airfoils, involutes, exhaust manifolds. In particular, I guess I'm looking for a technical description of some of the surfaces. I'm sure this type of data has to exist for airfoil and involute shapes in particular. Even medical application ideas may be useful.

      Does anyone have any suggestions for where to look for this type of information?

      Also any suggestons of other types of technical complex surfaces would be useful to me.

      Thanks in advance.
        • Complex Technical Surfaces
          Rhyc Sandberg

           

          Matt,

           

          For fans and volute cases, there is an old book out there by theBuffalo Forge company called "Fan Engineering" that has some usefulinformation - if you can find a copy. I think it's been out ofprint for a while.

           

          I'm currently helping with a project to design a blower that hasbeen done entirely in SolidWorks. We have some pretty goodsurfacing stuff going on in some of these models.

           

          Depending on what your need is, perhaps I could help out.

           

          Rhyc

           

            • Complex Technical Surfaces
              Matt Lombard
              If you could contribute some data I can get you and your company mentioned in the book and you'll get a free copy of the ~500 page SolidWorks surfacing book.

              If you're interested email me at matt@dezignstuff.com

              Thanks!
                • Complex Technical Surfaces
                  Kevin Quigley
                  Matt, what kind of surfaces are you after exactly? If the book ison surfacing put me down for a copy right now! In terms of complex"engineered" surfaces have you looked at boat hulls? Interms of consumer product surfacing there are many examples. Isthis what you are after (eg ideas for surfaces)?

                    • Complex Technical Surfaces
                      Matt Lombard
                      Yes, boat hulls are another good idea, thank you. I'm looking for things that are specified by technical data rather than aesthetic. I have plenty of examples of consumer products, artistic and decorative stuff. Can you refer me to a boat technical reference?

                      On the other hand, any requests or suggestions about anything at all are welcome for this new book. It is currently in process, with the first couple of chapters already written, and should be available in the spring of 08, based on 08 software.
                        • Complex Technical Surfaces
                          Kevin Quigley
                          Try these for general info:

                          http://www.boatdesign.net

                          http://www.aircraftdesign.com/

                          whereas this is a fairly typical example of the actual designprocess for technical surfacing

                          http://www.ugs.com/CaseStudyWeb/dispatch/viewCaseStudy.html?id=66

                          The problem is that once you get into technical surfacing (orperformance surfacing as opposed to aesthetics) it gets tied intoFEA and aero/hydro dynamic design. This really is the realm of thehigh end or specialist applications. For example many boat hullsare designed in apps like Maxsurf and exported into apps likeSolidWorks for "fitting out".

                          I've got a a couple of excellent contacts in the boat design sectorusing SolidWorks so if you need their contacts drop me an email offlist.

                          kevin.quigley@kqd.co.uk

                          Other areas to consider would be motor racing - but again it ismainly high end stuff there like CATIA or UG, although SW is usedfor mechanical design for brakes and gearboxes.





                            • Complex Technical Surfaces
                              Kevin Quigley
                              One final thought totally unrelated to the technical surfacing -there is a series of books out there (sold on Amazon) called DesignSecrets - Products (they also do them for Graphics and packaging)where they analyse 50 well known consumer products and look at thedesign process.

                              As a book buyer I would be very interested to know the surfacingmethodologies used in creating such products with a view toconceptual design and, more importantly, to generating finalsurfaces suitable for tooling (so no degenerative points!).Packaging is also a good place to look at - some very advancedsurfacing in some bottle packs.

                              Also it would be useful to have an independent experts view onSolidWorks surfacing add ons like SurfaceWorks(http://www.surfaceworks.com/index.html).

                              Or better yet a direct comparison to surfacing tools found in otherapps like Pro/E ISDX.

                              In my experience creating so,called one surface wonders or wildsurfaces is actually pretty easy. The real skill comes in makingsubtle effects like fade outs or things like ergonomic hand grips.
                    • Complex Technical Surfaces
                      Gary Gilmartin
                      Matt

                      When I did a reverse of a jumbo jet digital scan a couple of years ago I found this site quite useful, although I never used the actual airfoil profiles for my project.

                      http://www.ae.uiuc.edu/m-selig/ads.html

                      At the moment, I'm working on machines for pharmaceutical processing that require tailored mixer blade profiles, could that idea be useful?

                      Hope it helps.

                      Good luck.

                      Gary

                      P.S. I used your Bible to help (successfully) prepare for my CSWP exam last Friday. Couldn't have passed without it!

                      Gary
                      Advanced Surface/Solid Modelling
                      www.digital-oil.com
                      • Complex Technical Surfaces
                        Charles Culp
                        For a simplified *cough* version of the UIUC information, checkout the "airfoil" page on Wikipedia.

                        And for a fun demo on airfoils, check out NASA's page:
                        http://www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/K-12/airplane/foil2.html