4 Replies Latest reply on Sep 12, 2018 7:02 AM by Marcos Rodríguez

    add equation driven curve as parameter

    Mark Wood

      I'm trying to fully define an airfoil 'parametrically', so that I can import it into ANSYS/Fluent and use shape optimisation. I can define the airfoil using 'equation driven curve' but can't find any way to add this equation as a parameter. Is there any way to do this? Any help would be appreciated, thanks...

        • Re: add equation driven curve as parameter
          Shaodun Lin

          Hi Mark Wood

          Is this a SOLIDWORKS question or an ANSYS/Fluent question?

           

          Regards

            • Re: add equation driven curve as parameter
              Mark Wood

              Hi Shaodun,

               

              Sorry about the huge delay, things have been pretty hectic getting ready for the start of the new semester.

               

              First, this is a Solidworks question. I can define an airfoil with an 'equation driven curve' but can find no way to attach this as a 'parameter' to the line/airfoil.

               

              As an example of what I'm trying to do:

              (if this was for a cylinder instead of an airfoil)

               

              1. I would draw the cross section i.e circle
              2. I would add a driving dimension to the circle
              3. I would rename the dimension with 'DS' at the begining as this is the ANSYS 'parameter import key'.
              4. Repeat for length i.e. extrusion.

              This would give me a part that's design parameters could be optimised for a set observable eg lift/drag etc

               

              For a 4-digit NACA airfoil the eq is:

               

              y(t)=5*t*c[0.2969*sqrt(x/c)+(-0.1260)(x/c)+(-0.3516)(x/c)^2+0.2843(x/c)^3+(-1036)(x/c)^4]

               

              • c = chord length,
              • x = position along the chord from 0 to c,
              • y(t) = half thickness at a givenof x (centerline to surface),
              • t = max thickness as a fraction of chord (so 100 t gives the last two digits in the NACA 4-digit denomination)